ABRAHAM IN ARMS War and Gender in Colonial New England ANN M. LITTLE

ABRAHAM IN ARMS
ABRAHAM IN ARMS
Item# ISBN 0-8122-3965-2
$45.00

In 1678 the Puritan minister Samuel Nowell preached a sermon he called "Abraham in Arms," in which he urged his listeners to remember that "Hence it is no wayes unbecoming a Christian to learn to be a Souldier." The title of Nowell's sermon was well chosen. Abraham of the Old Testament resonated deeply with New England men, as he embodied the ideal of the householder-patriarch, at once obedient to God and the unquestioned leader of his family and his people in war and peace. Yet enemies (the French and the Indians) had challenged Abraham's authority in New England. In a bold reinterpretation of the years between 1620 and 1763, author Ann M. Little reveals how ideas about gender and family life were central to the ways people in colonial New England, and their neighbors in New France and Indian Country, described their experiences in cross-cultural warfare. Little argues that English, French, and Indian people had broadly similar ideas about gender and authority. Because they understood both warfare and political power to be intertwined expressions of manhood, colonial warfare may be understood as a contest of different styles of masculinity. 2007 hardcover, 262 pages.