THE DIVIDED GROUND Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution

THE DIVIDED GROUND
THE DIVIDED GROUND
Item# (2006) ISBN 0-679-45471-3
$35.00

In 1761, at a boarding school in New England, a young Mohawk Indian named Joseph Brant first met Samuel Kirkland, the son of a colonial clergyman. They began a long and intense relationship that would redefine North America. For nearly fifty years, their lives intertwined, at first as close friends but later as bitter foes. Kirkland served American expansion as a missionary and agent, promoting Indian conversion and dispossession. Brant pursued an alternative future for the continent by defending an Indian borderland nestled between the British in Canada and the Americans, rather than divided by them. By telling this dramatic story, Alan Taylor illuminates the dual borders that consolidated the new American nation after the Revolution. Taylor breaks with the stereotype of Indians as defiant but doomed traditionalists. In fact, the borderland Indians demonstrated remarkable adaptability and creativity in coping with the contending powers and with the growing numbers of invading settlers. Led by Joseph Brant, the natives tried to manage, rather than entirely to block, the process of settlement. Hardcover, 542 pages.