MERCHANT OF THE MEDOMAK: STORIES FROM WALDOBORO MAINE'S GOLDEN YEARS, 1860-1910

MERCHANT OF THE MEDOMAK
MERCHANT OF THE MEDOMAK
Item# ISBN 0965-2746-1-6
$30.00

Waldoboro was a major New England ship building and shipping center from the late 1700s until the early 1900s. Although, as in many Maine communities, records are scarce, we can be sure that over 600 sailing vessels were built, mainly within one-half mile of the village. The most common type of vessel built in Waldoboro was the schooner -- with two or three masts -- a "coaster," built to carry bulk cargoes such as wood, exported in the early days from local areas to the large cities of the East Coast. For example, between 1820 and 1840 eleven locally built schooners ran regularly between Waldoboro and Boston. Schooners operated like a trailer trucks of today, traveling back and forth, up and down the coast, making many trips each year. Cargo of any kind -- including animals and people -- was their business. Other types of vessels were also built in Waldoboro, including brigs, barks, barkentines, brigantines, sloops and ships. Many of the largest of these, particularly the ships, were sold to prominent firms that then used them in the trade to such faraway places as Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. In the closing decades of the 1800s, ships as large as 1700 tons were being built, followed in the early 1900s by the famous Palmer Schooner fleet, all of which exceeded 2000 tons. With his Palmer Schooner fleet, George Welt gave more hope that the shipbuilding industry would continue to flourish, but that was not to be. The forces bringing wooden shipbuilding and Waldoboro's glory days to an end were firmly in control. 332 Pages Paperback